Cash & Asset Forfeiture and Cash Seizure MEET THE TEAM

  • Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA)

    The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 is an important piece of proceeds of crime legislation that was introduced to take away the profitability of crimes committed, and act as a deterrent to others thinking they may be able to enjoy financial gain from criminal proceedings. If you’ve been accused of a crime and breaking money laundering regulations, and you’re facing the possibility of having to justify all earnings made since conviction, chances are you’ll be feeling distressed and anxious.

    DPP Law have decades of experience in handling serious fraud cases, where POCA legislation is involved. Our dedicated team of fraud solicitors work around the clock to ensure we get our clients the best possible outcome, and are on hand to offer professional, honest legal advice when needed.

    If you’ve been accused of a crime, you could be facing one of two orders from the Proceeds of Crime Act.

    Restraint Orders

    If you’ve been charged with an offence or are suspected of certain POCA offences, the court will most likely impose a restraint order on you. Provisions included under a restraint order can include:

    • The freezing of assets that may be the proceeds of a crime.
    • The freezing of third party assets that may be the proceeds of the crime.
    • Court order disclosures for the disclosure of UK assets, as well as assets abroad.
    • Appointment of Management Receivers to trace and recover assets.
    • Orders which are made for the purpose of limiting the living expenses and business expenditure of the defendant.

    Confiscation Orders

    If you’ve been found guilty of a crime, the prosecution will seek to place a confiscation order against you. This means that you’ll be given a predetermined amount of time to pay back what you owe. If you can’t pay back the amount in full, you’ll be sent to prison. There are some set prison sentences which have been set by the Powers of Criminal Courts Act 2000 and the full extent of confiscation proceedings against you.

    What should I do if I’m facing a restraint or confiscation order?

    If you’re facing a restraint or confiscation order, or you’ve been accused of a crime which may result in a proceeds of crime hearing, it’s vital to seek legal advice from a professional.

    Here at DPP Law, our POCA specialist solicitors can provide expert advice on your next steps. Contact us today for a confidential discussion.

  • Cash & Asset Forfeiture and Cash Seizure

    Cash and asset forfeiture and cash seizure is the taking away of money or goods during the course of an investigation.

    If the court has carried out a confiscation order, the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 allows the police to seize any cash or assets that are understood to be goods from ill-gotten gains.

    When an order has been issued, there is a belief that there are goods that have been bought by the proceeds of crime – or funded a crime. In some instances, police will seize goods that they believe have funded crime.

    These seizures can be carried out without any warning, often surprising the person in question.

    Police can seize anything from cash to property – and can be extremely distressing for the individuals and family concerned.

    What are the conditions for cash seizures?

    There are certain conditions that must apply before seizure. These include:

    • A police presence is lawful
    • There is reason to suggest that the money is recoverable property (obtained by unlawful conduct) or due to be used by any person unlawfully.
    • There appears to cash to the value of £1000 or more.

    What are the problems with cash and asset seizure?

    Problems arise when forfeiture and seizures take place needlessly. Because the court has issued an order, there is little to no notice given. Often situations occur when the individual has to go through a lengthy process to prove that the goods seized were not products of crime but from a legitimate source.

    In the meantime, back accounts are frozen and savings are seized, creating huge problems for the individual and any dependents.

    Unfortunately, when it comes to cash and asset forfeiture, the lawful model of being innocent until proven guilty is reversed.

    How DPP Law can help?

    DPP Law has many years of experience in helping people who have been implicated in cash and asset seizures. We understand that this situation requires a swift response to reach a conclusion.

    Call us on 0333 200 5859 or contact us here – one of our expert tax fraud solicitors will be in touch as soon as possible.

  • About Serious Fraud

    Fraud is defined as: - "An act of deception that is intended to allow you to personally gain or to cause a loss to another party". Fraud may simply be a single fraudulent transaction or may contain complex dealings between a group of people or businesses.

    Depending on the scale of the offence and type of fraud, the transaction(s) may be investigated by the police, HMRC, the Benefits Office or the Serious Fraud Office (SFO).

    Whatever the nature of the fraud offence, the law surrounding this offence is complicated and you should always consult with a solicitor for assistance. Our team is a top 10 supplier of Criminal Defence services and is ready to advise you based on their decades of experience and wealth of legal knowledge. Please contact us to find out how we will be able to help with your case.

  • Investment Fraud Defence Solicitors

    Pyramid and Ponzi schemes fall under the ’Get Rich Quick’ school of scams. Unlike a traditional business model, these schemes profit from the gathering of more investors. Both systems rely on hard-sell practices in order to pressure investors into make rash decisions, with no time to consider the pros and cons. They exist only by the recruitment of more and more investors. These investors put money into the system and are promised extraordinary returns. The cycle goes on and on until the recruitment pond dries up. What is the difference between a Pyramid Scheme and a Ponzi Scheme? A Ponzi scheme structure normally leads the participant to think that they are investing in something secure and solid. However, investors do not believe they are in a Ponzi scheme. Pyramid schemes differ slightly, as participants are aware that there is a chain, and they are responsible for the recruitment of new members in order to get a return on their investment. So the main difference is the level of knowledge about where investors are putting their money – Ponzi investors are tricked into investing in something that actually doesn’t exist, while pyramid investors are more aware of the structure they are entering. However with both schemes, investors have no idea how close to failure the systems actually are. The illegalities of Ponzi and Pyramid Schemes Running a Ponzi or pyramid scheme is illegal. The success of both models are limited and therefore they are seen as scams, as their basis – to recruit new members – cannot be sustained. Many pyramid schemes are disguised as multi-level marketing opportunities. This is how they identify as ‘legal’ entities, as they have assets that are traded and therefore in the strictest sense, have a legitimate business model. How DPP Law can help DPP Law has extensive knowledge of get rich quick schemes based on the Ponzi and Pyramid scheme model. If you have found yourself caught in such a scheme, either as an investor or an operator, good legal help will go a long way. Contact DPP Law today to ensure help, advice and support from highly trained fraud solicitors straightaway. Contact us here and we will get back to you as soon as possible.
  • Advance Fee Fraud

    Advance Fee Fraud occurs when a business or individual convince their victim to pay a fee upfront, for goods and services that do not exist. There are many different types of Advance Fee Fraud, including, but not limited to: 419 Fraud 419 fraud, also known as West African Letter Fraud, occurs when the victim is approached by a fraudster who says they are in a position of authority. The fraudster asks the victim to give them a ‘transaction fee’ or ‘legal fee’, so they can transfer a large amount of money to them, to get it out of another country such as Nigeria, lying in western Africa. The fraudster will often explain why the victim has been chosen to take part in this money transfer, and will usually make the victim swear to secrecy. However, there is no money to transfer, and the victim loses out on the down payment they have made. Clairvoyant / Psychic Scams This type of fraud usually occurs after the victim has suffered a loss of someone close to them, but has been known to happen to people from a wide range of circumstances. The fraudster will approach the victim via email, telephone call, post or even face-to-face, and tells them that they have had a message from the recently deceased, have seen something dreadful or wonderful in the victim’s future, or have sensed that the victim has been cursed. The fraudster will then ask for a down payment to help lift the curse, see the future or contact the deceased. It’s common for the victim to then never hear from the fraudster again, being scammed out of a sum of money in the process. Dating Scams Dating scams occur when a person joins an online dating site and is contacted by a fraudster who pretends to be interested in them romantically. The pair exchange messages and the fraudster eventually gains the victim’s trust, before telling them they are in trouble financially and need them to send money. It’s not uncommon for these fraudsters to ask their ‘romantic interest’ to send them intimate photographs of themselves, or perform sexual acts in front of a webcam. This is more common if the victim is female. Loan Scams This type of fraud usually occurs among people with bad credit scores. The victim will apply for a fast loan, and will be automatically approved, regardless of their poor credit history. The loan company will then contact the victim, saying that before the money can released, they will need to pay an upfront fee to insure the loan. Once the upfront fee has been paid, the victim will not hear from the loan company again, and no loan will be received. Rental Fraud Rental Fraud occurs when potential tenants are asked to pay an upfront fee to secure a rental property when, in fact, the property does not exist or is already being rented out to someone else. The victim then loses the money they have paid. Fraudsters often target students looking for student accommodation, as they are usually less experienced when it comes to renting. Work From Home Scams Also called ‘business opportunity scams’, work from home scams usually consist of a fraudster contacting a victim and asking them if they are interesting in making easy money from working from home. This is often through the victim setting up their own ‘online business’. Once the victim has shown interest, they will be asked to pay an upfront payment to cover the cost of setting up the website and the products they will be selling on. However, the products they receive will be almost worthless, and the victim will struggle to make any money from their ‘business’. It’s not uncommon for these scams to actually be pyramid schemes. What should I do if I’ve been accused of advanced fee fraud? If you’ve been accused of advance fee fraud, it’s important that you seek legal advice right away. Here at DPP Law, our expert team of fraud solicitors have been handling cases like yours for years, and we’d be delighted to help you. Contact us today for a chat about your next steps.
  • Boiler Room Fraud

    Boiler room fraud, sometimes called investment fraud or share scams, is increasing in today’s society. This type of serious fraud involves an individual persuading investors to hand over their bank details, convincing them to ‘invest’ in bogus, or practically worthless company shares or assets. It’s not unusual for boiler room fraudsters to send fake documents to victims, so the investments seem more trustworthy. A phone call to the potential investor is usually made by a professional sounding stockbroker, who discusses an ‘unmissable’ opportunity for investments to be made in company shares or assets, which sound too good to be true. The fraudster will usually offer research reports, special stockbroker tips or not-to-be-missed discounts on the shares, and promises the victim an unbelievable return on their investment. However, once the fraudsters have managed to get a substantial amount of money from the ‘investors’, the victims never hear from them again. Boiler room scams are not just limited to the investors. Sometimes, unsuspecting professionals are recruited to help with the scheme, completely unaware that they are working for a fraudulent business.

    The effect of Boiler Room Investment Scams

    Here at DPP Law, we’ve seen an increase in Boiler Room scams over the years. This has had a negative effect on legitimate stockbrokers and investment professionals, who are finding themselves under scrutiny due to the increasing crime levels. Scrutiny of boiler room fraud, and financial fraud as a whole, has meant that prosecutions have been rushed, so that justice is being seen to be done by the public. However, this often only serves to increase the chances of legitimate professionals being involved in serious, and often false, allegations.

    What should I do if I’ve been accused of boiler room fraud?

    If you’ve been accused of boiler room fraud, even if you’re not guilty, it’s essential that you seek professional legal advice straight away, so your solicitor can build a robust and convincing defence for your trial. At DPP Law, we have a dedicated team of fraud solicitors who work around the clock to ensure our clients get the justice they deserve. If you would like a free, confidential discussion about your next steps, contact us today.
  • Procurement and Outsourcing Fraud

    What is Procurement Fraud?

    Procurement fraud occurs when a company purchases goods and services, or commissions construction projects from a third party business. To do this, a tender process is followed, which ensures that everything is ‘above board’. If this process isn’t followed correctly it allows for discrepancies. Examples of procurement fraud include, but are not limited to:
    • A company uses the tender process to claim payment for goods or services that have not been delivered
    • A company uses the tender process to claim payment for goods or services that were of an inferior quality to what had been agreed.

    What is Outsourcing Fraud?

    Outsourcing fraud can cover a wide range of activities. The most common type of outsourcing fraud is where an employee uses the company money to pay for an outsourcer, when they in fact do the work themselves, thus pocketing the extra money. However, outsourcing fraud occurs in every level of organisations, and ranges from simple, one-off actions to complicated fraudulent operations.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of these crimes

    If you’ve been accused of procurement or outsourcing fraud, even if you’ve not done anything wrong, it’s essential that you seek professional legal advice as soon as possible. Our team of dedicated solicitors are experts in dealing with serious fraud cases, and are on hand to speak with you about your next steps. Complete our contact form and we will get back to you as soon as possible.
  • Banking Fraud

    Banking fraud is a broad term that covers a wide range of fraudulent activities. These include, but are not limited to:
    • Bank account fraud
    • False accounting fraud
    • Bank card fraud
    • Credit Card fraud
    • Cheque fraud
    • Cash point fraud
    • Using PIN entry devices
    • Mandate fraud
    The rise of internet banking has led to an increase in credit card fraud and ‘phishing’, which is the act of stealing financial information by fraudulent means. This could be through an email or instant message, claiming to be from your bank, building society or other trusted institution.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of banking fraud

    If you’ve been accused of banking fraud, chances are you’ll be feeling distressed. Even if you’ve not done anything wrong, it’s vital that you seek legal advice from a professional. Contact DPP Law today and a member of our dedicated team will be in touch.
  • Telecoms Fraud

    What is telecoms fraud?

    A lesser known fraud in the UK, telecoms fraud involves the misuse of telecommunications by fraudsters who either have no intention of paying the bill, or are looking to charge innocent people for services they did not ask for. Telecoms fraud includes, but is not limited to:
    • Text message scams
    • Missed call scams
    • Ringtone scams
    • Phone insurance scams
    • Fixed line fraud
    It’s not unusual for telecoms fraud to be linked with banking fraud.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of telecoms fraud

    If you’ve been accused of telecoms fraud, even if you’ve not done anything wrong, it’s essential that you seek legal advice from a professional, who is experienced in these types of cases. Get in contact with a member of our dedicated fraud solicitors for more information on how we can help.
  • Property and Mortgage Fraud

    What is mortgage fraud?

    Mortgage fraud can be anything from a large scale conspiracy to an individual lying on their mortgage application to benefit from a larger loan. Both are taken very seriously by the authorities, and if you’ve been accused of mortgage fraud, you could be facing imprisonment and an unlimited fine. If you’ve been accused of mortgage fraud, this can have an effect on both your personal and professional life, but it’s important to remain calm and seek legal advice as soon as possible. The most common type of mortgage fraud is called ‘opportunistic mortgage fraud’, and takes place when a person gives false or misleading information to obtain a mortgage. Information that may be given falsely includes, but is not limited to:
    • The person’s name
    • The person’s income, job title and/or employment status
    • The person’s other debt obligations (i.e. loans and credit cards)
    • The person’s financial status (i.e. if they have other means of funding the purchase)
    • The value of the property

    What should I do if I’ve been accused of mortgage fraud?

    If you’ve been accused of mortgage fraud, it’s essential that you seek legal advice from a professional. Here at DPP, we have years of experience in dealing with property fraud cases like yours, so call us directly on 0151 922 5525 or complete our contact form to discuss your next steps.
  • Pension Fraud

    What is pension fraud?

    Pension fraud occurs when a pensioner dies and their spouse or family members fail to inform the pension provider of their death, thus enabling them to continue to claim the deceased’s pension. If you’ve been accused of pension fraud, chances are you have recently lost someone close to you, so you’re already going through an emotional time as it is. You may feeling distressed, angry even, but it’s essential that you keep a level head and seek legal advice as soon as possible. However, this isn’t the only type of pension fraud. Pension fraud takes place in any instance where a pension is claimed fraudulently, so if a false claim is made to a private pension fraud that belongs to a pensioner. This could be from a family member, or even the pensioner themselves. Pension fraud is classed as a serious crime and can carry up to ten years imprisonment.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of pension fraud

    If you’ve been accused of pension fraud, it’s important to seek professional legal advice as soon as possible. Here at DPP Law, we have years of experience in handling pension fraud cases, and our knowledgeable team are dedicated to help our clients get the justice they deserve.
  • Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)

    If you’ve been accused of, or are concerned about being accused of fraud by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), it’s important that you get professional legal advice as soon as possible.

    Who are the FCA?

    The FCA took over the regulation of the UK’s financial services industry in 2000, and investigates high profile financial misconduct cases such as abuse of financial markets, fraud in business and money laundering. If you’re under investigation by the FCA, it’s important to know what they have the power to impose upon you. The FCA are able, by law, to subject businesses to financial penalties, issue fines, withdraw financial permissions and issue warning and decision notes. It’s also possible for the FCA to prosecute offenders through the UK courts, which could result in imprisonment or an unlimited fine for the defendant.

    What to do if you’re under investigation from the FCA

    If you’re under investigation from the FCA, it’s important to to seek legal advice from a professional, advisedly a solicitor who specialises in complex financial fraud matters. Contact us directly on 0151 922 5525 or fill out our contact form and a member of our knowledgeable legal team will be in touch.
  • Bribery and Corruption

    Individuals have faced the authorities for acts of bribery and corruption for a long time, but the Bribery Act 2010 created new criminal offences in this category, which can now include corporations. Here at DPP Law, we have years of experience in handling these types of cases, and our knowledge and expertise is essential for getting our clients the justice they deserve. The Bribery Act 2010 made it illegal to:
    • Bribe another person
    • Agree to accept a bribe
    • Bribe a foreign public official
    How can a corporation be found guilty of bribery and corruption? By failing to prevent a person associated with an organisation from bribing someone for the financial gain of the organisation. The penalties for an individual who is convicted of bribery and corruption can be up to 10 years imprisonment and, in the case of a corporation, an unlimited fine.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of bribery and corruption

    If you’ve been accused of bribery and corruption, it’s essential that you seek legal advice as soon as possible. If you’d like to discuss your next steps, contact a member of our expert team today.
  • Tax Evasion

    What is tax evasion?

    Tax evasion, also known as tax dodging, is a serious crime that can carry serious consequences for the defendant’s personal and professional life. If you’ve been caught intentionally avoiding tax, there’s a very real chance that you could be facing a prison sentence, so it’s vital that you seek legal advice as soon as possible. There are a range of different types of tax evasion. These include, but are not limited to:
    • Income tax fraud
    • Missing trader fraud (MTIC)
    • Money laundering
    • Diversion fraud
    Tax evasion is investigated by the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), and, depending on the seriousness of the situation, you may be subject to a civil tax investigation or a HMRC criminal investigation.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of tax evasion

    If you’ve been accused of tax evasion, it’s essential that you get legal advice and representation as soon as possible. Here at DPP Law, our expert tax solicitors specialise in all types of tax evasion, including HMRC tax avoidance investigations and money laundering cases. Contact us directly on 0151 922 5525 or complete our contact form and one of our expert legal team will be in touch.
  • Business Fraud

    Business Fraud is classed as a serious fraud offence, and can come with a hefty fine or prison sentence.

    If you’ve been accused of business fraud, it may a distressing time for you and those close to you. However, it’s important to remain calm and consider your next steps very carefully.

    What is business fraud?

    Business Fraud is any fraud that has been committed against or involving a business and its operation. This type of fraud comes in a variety of different forms, and ranges in scale.

    Some fraudsters have even fraudulently obtained billions from companies prior to being caught.

    Some of the main types of business fraud include:

    Pyramid schemes

    A pyramid scheme is a business model that recruits staff members with false promises (usually in the form of payment) for recruiting others into the scheme.

    This quickly becomes impossible to sustain as members are unable to profit. Anyone who joins a pyramid scheme usually has to pay an upfront payment and are promised that they will make this, and more, back within a certain amount of time.

    Often the only members of pyramid schemes that make any real money are those who are at the ‘top’ of the scheme, while others often end up worse off than they were before.

    Payment fraud

    This type of fraud involves falsely creating or diverting payments for financial gain. Examples of corporate payment fraud include generating false payments, making fraudulent payments and intercepting payee and cheque details.

    Bankruptcy fraud

    Bankruptcy fraud often takes place prior to the bankruptcy of a company and occurs when the directors of that business transfer assets from the failing company to a new one, avoiding paying debts accrued at the same time.

    Asset misappropriation

    This type of fraud involves third parties or employees of a company fraudulently using their position to take money from the business. This may involve directors, board members or bookkeepers.

    How to avoid becoming a victim of business fraud

    To avoid becoming a victim of business fraud, it’s important to always remain alert at all times. If you’re a small business owner and you notice something doesn’t quite add up regarding payroll, ask questions to the person responsible.

    When hiring new staff members, make sure you always go through the company hiring policies, even if you know the candidate personally. If you’re hiring a staff member that will be in a position of trust, i.e. a bookkeeper, you want to ensure that they have a good amount of experience, and always get references from their previous employers.

    If you are looking for work, avoid any ‘business opportunities’ that involve an upfront payment, as the chances of you seeing a return are probably minimal.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of business fraud

    If you’ve been accused of business fraud, even if you’re not guilty, it’s important that you seek legal advice and representation as soon as possible.

    Here at DPP Law, we’re experts in these types of cases, so contact us today to discuss your next steps.

  • Cyber Crime

    Cyber Crime, also known as Online Fraud and Internet Fraud, like many other types of fraud, is classed as a serious crime.  If you’ve been accused of a type of cyber crime, it’s important to consider your next steps very carefully.

    Here at DPP Law, we understand that being accused of any crime can be a distressing and confusing time for you and your family. However, it’s important to remain calm - losing your temper could make matters worse.

    How can we help? Our dedicated and approachable team of solicitors are experts in this type of crime, we have many years of experience and could help you seek the justice you deserve.

    What is Cyber Crime?

    Cyber crime, often called cyber fraud, Internet Fraud or Online Fraud , occurs when a fraudster uses the internet to take advantage of victims and defraud them. There are many types of Cyber Crime, including:

    Non-delivery of items / non-payment for items sold

    This is a common type of cyber crime that occurs when a victim makes a purchase from a fraudulent website. This could result in a fraudster taking the victim’s money/bank details, without sending any goods in return.

    Identity Theft

    This type of cyber crime comes in a variety of forms. However, the most common is that the victim receives an email from their ‘friend’ saying that they are in trouble and need money ASAP. However, the fraudster has actually hacked into a person’s email account and has stolen their identity for fraudulent purposes.

    Spam

    Spam, also known as junk mail, are emails that contain links used to hack into your computer to steal your personal information. Some spam links may give your computer a virus or send you to a useless or malicious website. These are usually found within junk bulk emails that contain links that will hack into your computer to steal your personal information, send you a virus or send you to a useless or malicious link.

    Credit Card Fraud

    Internet credit card fraud includes being overcharged for items that you’ve purchased online, or hitting the victim with unauthorised credit card charges. Click here to find out more about Credit Card Fraud.

    FBI / Government scams

    Have you ever been sent an email with something along the lines of ‘the FBI/government have money that’s been recovered on your behalf’? More often than not, this is an internet scam. If the FBI, a foreign government (including a related agency), or the government of your country of birth have money of yours, you won’t be notified by email.

    Miscellaneous Internet Fraud

    There are many types of Internet Fraud can include fake competitions, work from home scams and fake winnings.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of internet fraud

    It’s important to take internet fraud seriously, even if you’re not guilty. Seek legal advice as soon as possible. Here at DPP Law, our team are experts in these types of cases. Contact us today to discuss your next steps.
  • Insurance Fraud

    Being accused of insurance fraud, especially if it’s by a large company, can be a distressing experience for the accused and their families. When you’ve been accused of such a serious crime, it’s important to consider your next steps very carefully. Here at DPP Law, our dedicated team of insurance fraud solicitors have years of experience in these types of cases and strive to bring clients to justice.

    What is insurance fraud?

    Insurance fraud occurs when an act is committed with the intention of fraudulently gaining money from an insurance procedure. It comes in a variety of forms, and can occur before, during or after a claim has been made. Types of insurance fraud include:

    Life insurance fraud

    Life insurance fraud is committed when the fraudster fakes his/her own death in order to claim life insurance, which can be a six-figure sum.

    Car insurance fraud

    There are many types of car insurance fraud, including but limited to:
    • Staged car accidents: the fraudster/s stage a car accident in order to claim compensation.
    • Fronting: the fraudster uses another person’s details on the policy to save money on their insurance, i.e. putting the main driver as a named driver.
    • Application fraud: the fraudster intentionally puts the wrong information on their insurance application or withholds relevant information.
    • Exaggerated claims: an actual accident does occur, but the driver takes the opportunity to make up extra damages to claim compensation.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of insurance fraud

    If you’ve been accused of insurance fraud, it’s vital you get legal advice and representation as soon as possible. Our expert team of insurance fraud solicitors are dedicated to bringing clients to justice. Contact us on 0151 922 5525 or complete our contact form and one of our dedicated solicitors will be in touch.
  • Credit Card Fraud

    Credit card fraud is classed as serious fraud, so if you’ve been accused of credit card fraud it’s important to consider your next steps very carefully. A credit card fraud accusation, whether it be made by the credit card company or a friend or relative, can be a very distressing time for the accused. However, it’s important to keep a level head. Our dedicated team of credit card fraud solicitors have years of experience in dealing with these types of cases, and their experience and expertise is vital for bringing clients to justice.

    What is credit card fraud?

    Credit card fraud is the act of fraudulently using a credit or debit card to access funds to buy goods or services. This type of fraud ranges in scale, and there are many different variations. The two main types of credit card fraud are:

    Internet fraud

    The rise of online shopping has brought with it a whole new opportunity for credit card fraud. In fact, it is perfectly normal to place an order online with just the information that’s printed on the card itself. This makes it very easy for fraudsters to steal cards and pay for goods online before the owner has chance to cancel the card. Internet credit card fraud can be anything from a teenager using her Mum’s card online without permission, to a criminal gang setting up a false merchant site to obtain the card details of their ‘customers’.

    Skimming or cloning

    Skimming, or cloning as it is also known, is where a fraudster duplicates the information on the card’s magnetic strip by swiping it through a PIN Entry Device (PED). Sometimes, the PED is concealed, but other times fraudsters have been known to swipe the card in the PED right in front of unsuspecting victims, who think they are just paying for an item. Once the information has been obtained, a cloned card will be created.

    What to do if you’ve been accused of credit card fraud

    If you’ve been accused of credit card fraud, even if you’re not guilty, it’s vital you seek legal advice and counsel as soon as possible. Here at DPP Law, our expert team are experts when it comes to credit card fraud cases.
  • What is Serious Fraud?

    Fraud is defined as: - "An act of deception that is intended to allow you to personally gain or to cause a loss to another party". Fraud may simply be a single fraudulent transaction or may contain complex dealings between a group of people or businesses.

    Depending on the scale of the offence and type of fraud, the transaction(s) may be investigated by the police, HMRC, the Benefits Office or the Serious Fraud Office (SFO).

    Whatever the nature of the fraud offence, the law surrounding this offence is complicated and you should always consult with a solicitor for assistance. Our team is a top 10 supplier of Criminal Defence services and is ready to advise you based on their decades of experience and wealth of legal knowledge. Please contact us to find out how we will be able to help with your case.

  • VAT and Excise Fraud

    HMRC maintain a tough line with businesses such as the alcohol industry where they consider that tax evasion is more likely, partly because of the large amount of cash payments and low margins.  The attitude HMRC take is more on the line of prove you are not evading tax rather that HMRC proving you are.  As a result HMRC can start to involve you in a time consuming investigation which can damage your business even if no tax evasion has occurred. If tax evasion is discovered, HMRC make seek a civil or criminal remedy depending on the scale of the fraud but in both cases it is essential that appropriate advice is sought at the earliest stage of the investigation, preferably when you have first been notified of a planned inspection. DPP Law has associations with companies who specialise in advising businesses being investigated by HMRC and can help ensure that the correct procedures are being followed and minimise damage to your business while the investigation is proceeding. HMRC also are on the outlook for a fraud called Missing Trader Fraud, also known as MTIC or carousel fraud. This is where goods are imported with zero rate of VAT but are sold to the customer with VAT and this VAT is not passed on to the Government. The seller of the goods becomes a “missing trader”. Carousel Fraud also involves a “missing trader” with VAT being reclaimed many times for the same goods. If you have been arrested for tax evasion or tax fraud you need to have the best legal representation from solicitors with a successful track record in defending such cases.  In cases such as these, bank accounts can be frozen and travel restrictions applied which can cause major harm to your business. DPP Law has represented clients facing civil or criminal charges from small amounts up to multi-million pound claims whether or not legal aid is available.
  • Serious Fraud

    Serious fraud is normally dealt with by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) who normally deal with investigations into complex fraud such as investment fraud, large scale bribery and corruption, corporate fraud and public sector fraud. The investigations can take many months, are very complex and may involve the use of forensic accountants. This means that they always cause disruption to ongoing trade, which can be very harmful to businesses. However, our team of experienced fraud solicitors working out of our London and Birmingham offices can be on hand to help you at every stage of any investigation. The team has a wealth of experience to draw on to ensure that they can fight to maintain your freedom (e.g. to travel abroad) and thoroughly check that the correct procedures are being followed to ensure that the SFO does not abuse its powers at your expense.  
Talk to us